ORDNANCE SURVEY MEMOIR FOR THE PARISH OF SKERRY

The Society wishes to thank the Officers of the Royal Irish Academy for kindly permitting the publication of these Memoirs, and the Staff of the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland for its assistance in transcribing the text. There are three memoirs for this parish as for those already published. The first is by Lieutenant … Read more

January Lecture: The speaker on Friday 22nd January…

…will be Leonard Quigg, a committee member of the Glens of Antrim Historical Society, and the subject of his illustrated presentation will be “Robert Quigg V.C. – a Bushmills Hero.” Rifleman (later Sergeant) Robert Quigg was a soldier in The Royal Irish Rifles during The Great War of 1914 – 1918 and he was awarded … Read more

QUILTING By Mrs. Rose Emerson

(This article first appeared in 1975 in Volume 3 of The Glynns.  It is presented here with additional photographs and hyperlinks; also offered is the poem“The Quilting” by native Glens Poet Siobhan ni Luain) Glens Feis, Waterfoot, Glenariffe. My mind goes back seventy years to 1904 and the first Feis in the Glens.One wonders about … Read more

THE MILLS OF THE MIDDLE GLENS by Malachy McSparran Volume 4 (1976)

  Up until about twenty-five years ago, the mill was a prominent feature in the life of this area of the Middle Glens. Since that time when the last mill ceased to function, they have gradually disappeared. The purpose of this article is to identify and record what information is known about these mills before … Read more

“NOTES ON THE BLACKS AND McCURDYS OF THE GLENS AND RATHLIN”. Brian S. Turner

An apparently simple family name like Black can present quite a problem of identification. Its very simplicity makes it universal as a descriptive name and even in our small country it can come to us from several sources. In England and Scotland the name can derive from the Old English word “blaec” or “blac” meaning … Read more

CARNLOUGH HARBOUR DEVELOPMENT SCHEME, 1854—1864 by Jimmy Irvine

(This article first appeared in Volume 5 of The Glynns in 1977, it is presented here with added Hyperlinks and photographs)   The Marchioness of Londonderry inherited her Carnlough Estate on the death of her mother, the Countess of Antrim, in 1834.   Anne-Catherine MacDonnell, Countess of Antrim (circa. 1798) The  Marchioness did not begin … Read more

GRAVESTONE INSCRIPTIONS FROM NAPPAN By Brian S. Turner KILLYCRAPPIN GRAVEYARD County Antrim O.S. Sheet 20. Grid Ref. 292225.

  Killycrappin is one of those private corners of Ireland for which we have no evidence that it has ever been anything else.  It is on that part of the steep coast of Antrim which runs from just north of Carnlough to Garron Point and is know as the ‘Largy’.  (Leargaidh – the side or … Read more

TOWNLANDS — THEIR ORIGIN AND SIGNFICANCE: Cahal Dallat

“Townlands are one of the most dominant, albeit invisible features of our Ulster landscapes. The townland is the smallest administrative division in the country and all other territorial divisions are made up of collections of townlands. They are of great antiquity and there is evidence of their existence before the 12th century. Documents have survived … Read more

LEARNING THE ROPES: PATRICK MURRAY OF DUNURGAN, CUSHENDUN. Ed. Deirdre Roberts.

  Patrick Joseph Murray was born near Cushendun on 8th March 1872 and died in Glasgow,         84 years’ later. During the last war his youngest son asked for an account of his early life, and this followed in a series of letters. The letters have an interest well beyond family history, for they recall an … Read more