TIDES IN THE WATERS OF MOYLE by Wallace Clark

This article first appeared in The Glynns Volume 8 and is re-presented here with additional photographs and hyperlinks.   Any boat passage between Scotland and North East Ireland is influenced by the strong tidal streams which run through the narrows. The navigator may have to aim off right or left to allow for the side-ways … Read more

THE CAMPELTOWN CUSTOMS RECORDS by Jimmy Irvine

This article first appeared in Volume 4 of The Glynns in 1976.  It is presented here with additional photographs and hyperlinks.   The Campbeltown Port Customs Records consist of outgoing letters from the Collector of Customs at the port to the Board of Customs at Edinburgh, together with further volumes of incoming directives and enquiries from … Read more

Kelp Burning In The Glens of Antrim by Douglas Harper

By Douglas Harper   The burning of seaweed to make kelp was one of the oldest traditional industries to flourish round the coasts of Ireland.  For some it was their only livelihood; to most it was a seasonal occupation which brought them those little extras to make life more comfortable.  A new suit or frock … Read more

MARCONI and BALLYCASTLE

Editorial Note.  The following article is the text of a lecture given by the late Hugh Alexander Boyd M.A. M.Lit. M.Phil. M.A.(Ed) H.DipEd. (1907-1996) at St. Mary Star of the Sea Secondary School on the occasion of Ballycastle Civic Week in August 1968. We are grateful to Mrs Pearl Boyd for her permission to print … Read more

SCOTTISH GALLEY SAILS INTO HISTORY WITH BELFAST TRIP by Michael Drake

  “John Mor MacDonnell, the second son of Eoin na h-Ile, or John of Isla, and grandson by his mother of Robert II, came to the Antrim Glynns for a wife. The lady [Margery Bissett] by whom he was attracted hither was young, high-born, handsome, and an heiress.” This is how Rev. George Hill described … Read more

A BALLYCASTLE ANNIVERSARY MEMORIES OF THE FIRST REGATTA AND SPORTS by HUGH ALEXANDER BOYD

  The first recorded Ballycastle regatta and sports was held on Thursday, 27th August, 1869. It was a great week in the history of what was sometimes affectionately referred to as the “wee town”. The place was then a comparatively small township; indeed it was not until just over half a century later — 1920 … Read more

A MAP PROPOSING ANOTHER SCOTTISH CONNECTION: Cahal Dallat

  For centuries people have looked across from North Antrim to the Mull of Kintyre and the poor sailors among them have wished that there was some way of getting across without having to endure the trauma of being violently sea-sick. There may have been some relief for such individuals when, as recorded by in … Read more

THE PROPOSED IRISH CHANNEL TUNNEL Rev. Kevin McHugh S.S.C

This summer, while browsing in the National Library, Dublin, I chanced upon a reference to Cushendun. This led me to an article in a publication entitled THE IRISH BUILDER. I read it with interest and jotted down the contents. Sometime later I discussed the article with the Editor of THE GLYNNS who suggested that I … Read more

LEARNING THE ROPES: PATRICK MURRAY OF DUNURGAN, CUSHENDUN. Ed. Deirdre Roberts.

  Patrick Joseph Murray was born near Cushendun on 8th March 1872 and died in Glasgow,         84 years’ later. During the last war his youngest son asked for an account of his early life, and this followed in a series of letters. The letters have an interest well beyond family history, for they recall an … Read more