MARCH LECTURE: FROM ISLAND TO ISLAND TO ISLAND BY MARY O’DRISCOLL. 8.30pm Parish Centre Cushendall. Friday 21st March 2014. ALL WELCOME

 

In her lecture “From Island to Island to Island”, Mary O’Driscoll, manager of Rathlin Ferries and Cape Clear Holidays will discuss the nature of her work during the summer months on both Rathlin Island http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rathlin_Island and Cape Clear Island http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cape_Clear_Island

Mary will also discuss the fascinating islands around the world she has visited.  The Lecture commences at 8.30pm.  All welcome.

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Rathlin Island is situated off the north east coast of Ireland, and is the only inhabited offshore island in Northern Ireland. Because of its geographical position, Rathlin has long had associations with both Ireland and Scotland, and it once lay at the heart of the ancient kingdom of Dal Riada.

The island has County Antrim to the south, the Inishowen peninsula in County Donegal to the west, the island of Islay in the Hebrides to the north, and the Mull of Kintyre in mainland Scotland to the east. Today, Rathlin has modern transport and tourist facilities, and a steadily rising permanent population of over 100.  Rathlin Island has a long and eventful history, and some of the most breath-taking scenery anywhere in Ireland or Britain. It offers unspoilt environments and is renowned for its wildlife, particularly its seabird breeding colonies. http://www.rathlincommunity.org

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CAPE CLEAR, Ireland’s southernmost inhabited Gaeltacht island, is 3 miles long by 1 mile wide, and lies 8 miles off the coast of West Cork. Three miles west of the island stands the solitary Fastnet Rock.  Saint Ciarán, the island’s patron saint, allegedly the earliest of Ireland’s four pre-Patrician saints, was born on Cape Clear.  To the northwest stretches Mizen Head, the mainland’s most southerly point. Cape Clear’s wild romantic scenery, its sparkling harbours, its cliffs, bogs and lake, all contribute to the island’s unspoilt charm. Heather, gorse and wild flowers cover the rugged hills. Megalithic standing stones, a 5000 year-old passage grave, a 12th century church ruin, the 14th century O’Driscoll castle, (cannonaded in the early 1600’s), all relate to times past.   

Cape Clear’s remote island location, coupled with its proximity to the continental shelf, makes it the foremost centre for bird watching in Ireland. Whales, leatherback turtles, sun fish, dolphins and sharks are spotted regularly every year. Most of the 120 inhabitants speak Irish and English. Removed from the hustle and bustle of mainland life, Cape Clear offers relaxation, nature and peace. http://www.capeclearisland.ie/

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